Research Paper On Hiv Aids Among Teenagers Who Attempt My Life With HIV

Journal Of HIV/AIDS Prevention & Education For Adolescents ...

My Life With HIV

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    My Life With HIV

    My Life With HIV

    Story By Brad Subscribe: There was this guy called Brad, and one day he found something he could never have dreamed of - he was infected HIV-positive.He found out when he was 16 years old. Brad played for the volleyball team at his school. Every year, he had a medical before starting his training.That time, Brad was called into to see the school doctor for a private talk. It turned out to be a moment he would never forget. A lot of things were explained to him, but he only remembered that one phrase: “You’re HIV-positive.” The feeling was one of plummeting down from a very high building. “What is aids? This has to be a mistake,” he thought. But it wasn’t. He had no idea how he had caught it. Neither he nor any member of his family was part of one of the risk groups. He went over the issue in his mind for hours on end, but gave up after getting nowhere.Brad has little recollection of what he did over the next few weeks. He was angry at his doctor for smiling at him when she talked about his therapy. Brad should have listened to her more attentively, because she was explaining something important. All he got was that he had to take some pills to extend his miserable life for a few more years.Then there was that horrible talk with his parents. Brad loved them, but they had always been distant. Although they were kind about it when he told them, he sensed the disappointment in their eyes. He knew deep down that they thought HIV was something only bad people got.Brad expected no support from them. He became afraid to leave his house, because he was scared he’d be bullied or infect someone else. He knew, of course, that he couldn’t give someone HIV by just sneezing on them, and that his status was entirely confidential, but the situation made him irrational.And so Brad shut himself away in his bedroom, only occasionally emerging to go to school. He forgot all about his volleyball training. Sometimes, his parents would come and try and start a conversation, but Brad knew what they were really thinking, and had little interest in talking. He lived a lonely life split between his computer and the TV, imagining that the walls were slowly closing in to crush him.After about a month of this, Coach Stephens turned up to find out why he had quit volleyball. He thought Brad was ill and wanted to help. Brad had vowed to never tell anyone, but the hours of silence led him to blurt out: “I’m HIV-positive, okay? I’m going to die soon, so just leave me alone!” His coach looked at him with a serious expression and said: “No need to shout. You know, I’ve been HIV-positive for 16 years.” His words hit Brad like a bucket of cold water. He’d never realised that there might be other people like him out there. Coach Stephens then explained the idea of antiretroviral therapy, along with other things his doctor had told him about but which he hadn’t been able to take in. Brad cried like a baby.Coach Stephens promised to help him. He talked to his parents, explaining things they would otherwise never have understood. He got Brad back into volleyball training and introduced him to an HIV teenage support group, where he met new and very supportive people. Brad’s life is far from perfect now, but he’s learned to appreciate what life has given him. His parents are now more supportive, and are learning to be more open. He’s more responsible, both towards himself and others. All this is thanks to Coach Stephens, who gave Brad hope. Now, Brad wants to give someone else hope too. That’s why he’s decided to volunteer to help other teenagers escape the misery he found himself in.Brad has a way to sum up his situation: Instead of feeling HIV-positive, now he just feels positive. He knows he’s not alone, and that he has people around him to give him strength. And there’s one other good thing. Five years ago, he met a young woman who became his soulmate. Two years ago, she agreed to become his wife. Last week, she gave birth to his first, entirely healthy daughter. Brad has no way to express how happy he is. If only he could have known what lay ahead of him six years ago!How did I find out that I have HIV + 0:05I talked to my new doctor 0:55 Talk with my parents 1:15I locked myself alone 1:50Coach Stevens came to me 2:17I was crying like a baby 3:14I decided to volunteer 3:50A private one thing 4:15What's your story? Actually Happened want to hear it!Send your story time: [email protected] you liked this Actually happened animation and love storytime/ story time, true stories animated videos, watch our best video:Don't Judge A Book By It's Cover:https://bit.ly/2y4QPsz

    South Africa Teens with HIV/AIDS

    South Africa Teens with HIV/AIDS

    Story By Brad Subscribe: There was this guy called Brad, and one day he found something he could never have dreamed of - he was infected HIV-positive.He found out when he was 16 years old. Brad played for the volleyball team at his school. Every year, he had a medical before starting his training.That time, Brad was called into to see the school doctor for a private talk. It turned out to be a moment he would never forget. A lot of things were explained to him, but he only remembered that one phrase: “You’re HIV-positive.” The feeling was one of plummeting down from a very high building. “What is aids? This has to be a mistake,” he thought. But it wasn’t. He had no idea how he had caught it. Neither he nor any member of his family was part of one of the risk groups. He went over the issue in his mind for hours on end, but gave up after getting nowhere.Brad has little recollection of what he did over the next few weeks. He was angry at his doctor for smiling at him when she talked about his therapy. Brad should have listened to her more attentively, because she was explaining something important. All he got was that he had to take some pills to extend his miserable life for a few more years.Then there was that horrible talk with his parents. Brad loved them, but they had always been distant. Although they were kind about it when he told them, he sensed the disappointment in their eyes. He knew deep down that they thought HIV was something only bad people got.Brad expected no support from them. He became afraid to leave his house, because he was scared he’d be bullied or infect someone else. He knew, of course, that he couldn’t give someone HIV by just sneezing on them, and that his status was entirely confidential, but the situation made him irrational.And so Brad shut himself away in his bedroom, only occasionally emerging to go to school. He forgot all about his volleyball training. Sometimes, his parents would come and try and start a conversation, but Brad knew what they were really thinking, and had little interest in talking. He lived a lonely life split between his computer and the TV, imagining that the walls were slowly closing in to crush him.After about a month of this, Coach Stephens turned up to find out why he had quit volleyball. He thought Brad was ill and wanted to help. Brad had vowed to never tell anyone, but the hours of silence led him to blurt out: “I’m HIV-positive, okay? I’m going to die soon, so just leave me alone!” His coach looked at him with a serious expression and said: “No need to shout. You know, I’ve been HIV-positive for 16 years.” His words hit Brad like a bucket of cold water. He’d never realised that there might be other people like him out there. Coach Stephens then explained the idea of antiretroviral therapy, along with other things his doctor had told him about but which he hadn’t been able to take in. Brad cried like a baby.Coach Stephens promised to help him. He talked to his parents, explaining things they would otherwise never have understood. He got Brad back into volleyball training and introduced him to an HIV teenage support group, where he met new and very supportive people. Brad’s life is far from perfect now, but he’s learned to appreciate what life has given him. His parents are now more supportive, and are learning to be more open. He’s more responsible, both towards himself and others. All this is thanks to Coach Stephens, who gave Brad hope. Now, Brad wants to give someone else hope too. That’s why he’s decided to volunteer to help other teenagers escape the misery he found himself in.Brad has a way to sum up his situation: Instead of feeling HIV-positive, now he just feels positive. He knows he’s not alone, and that he has people around him to give him strength. And there’s one other good thing. Five years ago, he met a young woman who became his soulmate. Two years ago, she agreed to become his wife. Last week, she gave birth to his first, entirely healthy daughter. Brad has no way to express how happy he is. If only he could have known what lay ahead of him six years ago!How did I find out that I have HIV + 0:05I talked to my new doctor 0:55 Talk with my parents 1:15I locked myself alone 1:50Coach Stevens came to me 2:17I was crying like a baby 3:14I decided to volunteer 3:50A private one thing 4:15What's your story? Actually Happened want to hear it!Send your story time: [email protected] you liked this Actually happened animation and love storytime/ story time, true stories animated videos, watch our best video:Don't Judge A Book By It's Cover:https://bit.ly/2y4QPsz

    I Suffer From Facial Wasting Due To HIV

    I Suffer From Facial Wasting Due To HIV

    Story By Brad Subscribe: There was this guy called Brad, and one day he found something he could never have dreamed of - he was infected HIV-positive.He found out when he was 16 years old. Brad played for the volleyball team at his school. Every year, he had a medical before starting his training.That time, Brad was called into to see the school doctor for a private talk. It turned out to be a moment he would never forget. A lot of things were explained to him, but he only remembered that one phrase: “You’re HIV-positive.” The feeling was one of plummeting down from a very high building. “What is aids? This has to be a mistake,” he thought. But it wasn’t. He had no idea how he had caught it. Neither he nor any member of his family was part of one of the risk groups. He went over the issue in his mind for hours on end, but gave up after getting nowhere.Brad has little recollection of what he did over the next few weeks. He was angry at his doctor for smiling at him when she talked about his therapy. Brad should have listened to her more attentively, because she was explaining something important. All he got was that he had to take some pills to extend his miserable life for a few more years.Then there was that horrible talk with his parents. Brad loved them, but they had always been distant. Although they were kind about it when he told them, he sensed the disappointment in their eyes. He knew deep down that they thought HIV was something only bad people got.Brad expected no support from them. He became afraid to leave his house, because he was scared he’d be bullied or infect someone else. He knew, of course, that he couldn’t give someone HIV by just sneezing on them, and that his status was entirely confidential, but the situation made him irrational.And so Brad shut himself away in his bedroom, only occasionally emerging to go to school. He forgot all about his volleyball training. Sometimes, his parents would come and try and start a conversation, but Brad knew what they were really thinking, and had little interest in talking. He lived a lonely life split between his computer and the TV, imagining that the walls were slowly closing in to crush him.After about a month of this, Coach Stephens turned up to find out why he had quit volleyball. He thought Brad was ill and wanted to help. Brad had vowed to never tell anyone, but the hours of silence led him to blurt out: “I’m HIV-positive, okay? I’m going to die soon, so just leave me alone!” His coach looked at him with a serious expression and said: “No need to shout. You know, I’ve been HIV-positive for 16 years.” His words hit Brad like a bucket of cold water. He’d never realised that there might be other people like him out there. Coach Stephens then explained the idea of antiretroviral therapy, along with other things his doctor had told him about but which he hadn’t been able to take in. Brad cried like a baby.Coach Stephens promised to help him. He talked to his parents, explaining things they would otherwise never have understood. He got Brad back into volleyball training and introduced him to an HIV teenage support group, where he met new and very supportive people. Brad’s life is far from perfect now, but he’s learned to appreciate what life has given him. His parents are now more supportive, and are learning to be more open. He’s more responsible, both towards himself and others. All this is thanks to Coach Stephens, who gave Brad hope. Now, Brad wants to give someone else hope too. That’s why he’s decided to volunteer to help other teenagers escape the misery he found himself in.Brad has a way to sum up his situation: Instead of feeling HIV-positive, now he just feels positive. He knows he’s not alone, and that he has people around him to give him strength. And there’s one other good thing. Five years ago, he met a young woman who became his soulmate. Two years ago, she agreed to become his wife. Last week, she gave birth to his first, entirely healthy daughter. Brad has no way to express how happy he is. If only he could have known what lay ahead of him six years ago!How did I find out that I have HIV + 0:05I talked to my new doctor 0:55 Talk with my parents 1:15I locked myself alone 1:50Coach Stevens came to me 2:17I was crying like a baby 3:14I decided to volunteer 3:50A private one thing 4:15What's your story? Actually Happened want to hear it!Send your story time: [email protected] you liked this Actually happened animation and love storytime/ story time, true stories animated videos, watch our best video:Don't Judge A Book By It's Cover:https://bit.ly/2y4QPsz

    Fighting HIV by Empowering Adolescent Girls and Young Women: PEPFAR’s DREAMS Partnership

    Fighting HIV by Empowering Adolescent Girls and Young Women: PEPFAR’s DREAMS Partnership

    Story By Brad Subscribe: There was this guy called Brad, and one day he found something he could never have dreamed of - he was infected HIV-positive.He found out when he was 16 years old. Brad played for the volleyball team at his school. Every year, he had a medical before starting his training.That time, Brad was called into to see the school doctor for a private talk. It turned out to be a moment he would never forget. A lot of things were explained to him, but he only remembered that one phrase: “You’re HIV-positive.” The feeling was one of plummeting down from a very high building. “What is aids? This has to be a mistake,” he thought. But it wasn’t. He had no idea how he had caught it. Neither he nor any member of his family was part of one of the risk groups. He went over the issue in his mind for hours on end, but gave up after getting nowhere.Brad has little recollection of what he did over the next few weeks. He was angry at his doctor for smiling at him when she talked about his therapy. Brad should have listened to her more attentively, because she was explaining something important. All he got was that he had to take some pills to extend his miserable life for a few more years.Then there was that horrible talk with his parents. Brad loved them, but they had always been distant. Although they were kind about it when he told them, he sensed the disappointment in their eyes. He knew deep down that they thought HIV was something only bad people got.Brad expected no support from them. He became afraid to leave his house, because he was scared he’d be bullied or infect someone else. He knew, of course, that he couldn’t give someone HIV by just sneezing on them, and that his status was entirely confidential, but the situation made him irrational.And so Brad shut himself away in his bedroom, only occasionally emerging to go to school. He forgot all about his volleyball training. Sometimes, his parents would come and try and start a conversation, but Brad knew what they were really thinking, and had little interest in talking. He lived a lonely life split between his computer and the TV, imagining that the walls were slowly closing in to crush him.After about a month of this, Coach Stephens turned up to find out why he had quit volleyball. He thought Brad was ill and wanted to help. Brad had vowed to never tell anyone, but the hours of silence led him to blurt out: “I’m HIV-positive, okay? I’m going to die soon, so just leave me alone!” His coach looked at him with a serious expression and said: “No need to shout. You know, I’ve been HIV-positive for 16 years.” His words hit Brad like a bucket of cold water. He’d never realised that there might be other people like him out there. Coach Stephens then explained the idea of antiretroviral therapy, along with other things his doctor had told him about but which he hadn’t been able to take in. Brad cried like a baby.Coach Stephens promised to help him. He talked to his parents, explaining things they would otherwise never have understood. He got Brad back into volleyball training and introduced him to an HIV teenage support group, where he met new and very supportive people. Brad’s life is far from perfect now, but he’s learned to appreciate what life has given him. His parents are now more supportive, and are learning to be more open. He’s more responsible, both towards himself and others. All this is thanks to Coach Stephens, who gave Brad hope. Now, Brad wants to give someone else hope too. That’s why he’s decided to volunteer to help other teenagers escape the misery he found himself in.Brad has a way to sum up his situation: Instead of feeling HIV-positive, now he just feels positive. He knows he’s not alone, and that he has people around him to give him strength. And there’s one other good thing. Five years ago, he met a young woman who became his soulmate. Two years ago, she agreed to become his wife. Last week, she gave birth to his first, entirely healthy daughter. Brad has no way to express how happy he is. If only he could have known what lay ahead of him six years ago!How did I find out that I have HIV + 0:05I talked to my new doctor 0:55 Talk with my parents 1:15I locked myself alone 1:50Coach Stevens came to me 2:17I was crying like a baby 3:14I decided to volunteer 3:50A private one thing 4:15What's your story? Actually Happened want to hear it!Send your story time: [email protected] you liked this Actually happened animation and love storytime/ story time, true stories animated videos, watch our best video:Don't Judge A Book By It's Cover:https://bit.ly/2y4QPsz

    1982 - 1992 News Clips On HIV/AIDS (The First Ten Years)

    1982 - 1992 News Clips On HIV/AIDS (The First Ten Years)

    Story By Brad Subscribe: There was this guy called Brad, and one day he found something he could never have dreamed of - he was infected HIV-positive.He found out when he was 16 years old. Brad played for the volleyball team at his school. Every year, he had a medical before starting his training.That time, Brad was called into to see the school doctor for a private talk. It turned out to be a moment he would never forget. A lot of things were explained to him, but he only remembered that one phrase: “You’re HIV-positive.” The feeling was one of plummeting down from a very high building. “What is aids? This has to be a mistake,” he thought. But it wasn’t. He had no idea how he had caught it. Neither he nor any member of his family was part of one of the risk groups. He went over the issue in his mind for hours on end, but gave up after getting nowhere.Brad has little recollection of what he did over the next few weeks. He was angry at his doctor for smiling at him when she talked about his therapy. Brad should have listened to her more attentively, because she was explaining something important. All he got was that he had to take some pills to extend his miserable life for a few more years.Then there was that horrible talk with his parents. Brad loved them, but they had always been distant. Although they were kind about it when he told them, he sensed the disappointment in their eyes. He knew deep down that they thought HIV was something only bad people got.Brad expected no support from them. He became afraid to leave his house, because he was scared he’d be bullied or infect someone else. He knew, of course, that he couldn’t give someone HIV by just sneezing on them, and that his status was entirely confidential, but the situation made him irrational.And so Brad shut himself away in his bedroom, only occasionally emerging to go to school. He forgot all about his volleyball training. Sometimes, his parents would come and try and start a conversation, but Brad knew what they were really thinking, and had little interest in talking. He lived a lonely life split between his computer and the TV, imagining that the walls were slowly closing in to crush him.After about a month of this, Coach Stephens turned up to find out why he had quit volleyball. He thought Brad was ill and wanted to help. Brad had vowed to never tell anyone, but the hours of silence led him to blurt out: “I’m HIV-positive, okay? I’m going to die soon, so just leave me alone!” His coach looked at him with a serious expression and said: “No need to shout. You know, I’ve been HIV-positive for 16 years.” His words hit Brad like a bucket of cold water. He’d never realised that there might be other people like him out there. Coach Stephens then explained the idea of antiretroviral therapy, along with other things his doctor had told him about but which he hadn’t been able to take in. Brad cried like a baby.Coach Stephens promised to help him. He talked to his parents, explaining things they would otherwise never have understood. He got Brad back into volleyball training and introduced him to an HIV teenage support group, where he met new and very supportive people. Brad’s life is far from perfect now, but he’s learned to appreciate what life has given him. His parents are now more supportive, and are learning to be more open. He’s more responsible, both towards himself and others. All this is thanks to Coach Stephens, who gave Brad hope. Now, Brad wants to give someone else hope too. That’s why he’s decided to volunteer to help other teenagers escape the misery he found himself in.Brad has a way to sum up his situation: Instead of feeling HIV-positive, now he just feels positive. He knows he’s not alone, and that he has people around him to give him strength. And there’s one other good thing. Five years ago, he met a young woman who became his soulmate. Two years ago, she agreed to become his wife. Last week, she gave birth to his first, entirely healthy daughter. Brad has no way to express how happy he is. If only he could have known what lay ahead of him six years ago!How did I find out that I have HIV + 0:05I talked to my new doctor 0:55 Talk with my parents 1:15I locked myself alone 1:50Coach Stevens came to me 2:17I was crying like a baby 3:14I decided to volunteer 3:50A private one thing 4:15What's your story? Actually Happened want to hear it!Send your story time: [email protected] you liked this Actually happened animation and love storytime/ story time, true stories animated videos, watch our best video:Don't Judge A Book By It's Cover:https://bit.ly/2y4QPsz

    How Close Are We to Curing HIV/AIDS?

    How Close Are We to Curing HIV/AIDS?

    Story By Brad Subscribe: There was this guy called Brad, and one day he found something he could never have dreamed of - he was infected HIV-positive.He found out when he was 16 years old. Brad played for the volleyball team at his school. Every year, he had a medical before starting his training.That time, Brad was called into to see the school doctor for a private talk. It turned out to be a moment he would never forget. A lot of things were explained to him, but he only remembered that one phrase: “You’re HIV-positive.” The feeling was one of plummeting down from a very high building. “What is aids? This has to be a mistake,” he thought. But it wasn’t. He had no idea how he had caught it. Neither he nor any member of his family was part of one of the risk groups. He went over the issue in his mind for hours on end, but gave up after getting nowhere.Brad has little recollection of what he did over the next few weeks. He was angry at his doctor for smiling at him when she talked about his therapy. Brad should have listened to her more attentively, because she was explaining something important. All he got was that he had to take some pills to extend his miserable life for a few more years.Then there was that horrible talk with his parents. Brad loved them, but they had always been distant. Although they were kind about it when he told them, he sensed the disappointment in their eyes. He knew deep down that they thought HIV was something only bad people got.Brad expected no support from them. He became afraid to leave his house, because he was scared he’d be bullied or infect someone else. He knew, of course, that he couldn’t give someone HIV by just sneezing on them, and that his status was entirely confidential, but the situation made him irrational.And so Brad shut himself away in his bedroom, only occasionally emerging to go to school. He forgot all about his volleyball training. Sometimes, his parents would come and try and start a conversation, but Brad knew what they were really thinking, and had little interest in talking. He lived a lonely life split between his computer and the TV, imagining that the walls were slowly closing in to crush him.After about a month of this, Coach Stephens turned up to find out why he had quit volleyball. He thought Brad was ill and wanted to help. Brad had vowed to never tell anyone, but the hours of silence led him to blurt out: “I’m HIV-positive, okay? I’m going to die soon, so just leave me alone!” His coach looked at him with a serious expression and said: “No need to shout. You know, I’ve been HIV-positive for 16 years.” His words hit Brad like a bucket of cold water. He’d never realised that there might be other people like him out there. Coach Stephens then explained the idea of antiretroviral therapy, along with other things his doctor had told him about but which he hadn’t been able to take in. Brad cried like a baby.Coach Stephens promised to help him. He talked to his parents, explaining things they would otherwise never have understood. He got Brad back into volleyball training and introduced him to an HIV teenage support group, where he met new and very supportive people. Brad’s life is far from perfect now, but he’s learned to appreciate what life has given him. His parents are now more supportive, and are learning to be more open. He’s more responsible, both towards himself and others. All this is thanks to Coach Stephens, who gave Brad hope. Now, Brad wants to give someone else hope too. That’s why he’s decided to volunteer to help other teenagers escape the misery he found himself in.Brad has a way to sum up his situation: Instead of feeling HIV-positive, now he just feels positive. He knows he’s not alone, and that he has people around him to give him strength. And there’s one other good thing. Five years ago, he met a young woman who became his soulmate. Two years ago, she agreed to become his wife. Last week, she gave birth to his first, entirely healthy daughter. Brad has no way to express how happy he is. If only he could have known what lay ahead of him six years ago!How did I find out that I have HIV + 0:05I talked to my new doctor 0:55 Talk with my parents 1:15I locked myself alone 1:50Coach Stevens came to me 2:17I was crying like a baby 3:14I decided to volunteer 3:50A private one thing 4:15What's your story? Actually Happened want to hear it!Send your story time: [email protected] you liked this Actually happened animation and love storytime/ story time, true stories animated videos, watch our best video:Don't Judge A Book By It's Cover:https://bit.ly/2y4QPsz

    New Research Hopes to Speed Development of HIV Vaccine

    New Research Hopes to Speed Development of HIV Vaccine

    Story By Brad Subscribe: There was this guy called Brad, and one day he found something he could never have dreamed of - he was infected HIV-positive.He found out when he was 16 years old. Brad played for the volleyball team at his school. Every year, he had a medical before starting his training.That time, Brad was called into to see the school doctor for a private talk. It turned out to be a moment he would never forget. A lot of things were explained to him, but he only remembered that one phrase: “You’re HIV-positive.” The feeling was one of plummeting down from a very high building. “What is aids? This has to be a mistake,” he thought. But it wasn’t. He had no idea how he had caught it. Neither he nor any member of his family was part of one of the risk groups. He went over the issue in his mind for hours on end, but gave up after getting nowhere.Brad has little recollection of what he did over the next few weeks. He was angry at his doctor for smiling at him when she talked about his therapy. Brad should have listened to her more attentively, because she was explaining something important. All he got was that he had to take some pills to extend his miserable life for a few more years.Then there was that horrible talk with his parents. Brad loved them, but they had always been distant. Although they were kind about it when he told them, he sensed the disappointment in their eyes. He knew deep down that they thought HIV was something only bad people got.Brad expected no support from them. He became afraid to leave his house, because he was scared he’d be bullied or infect someone else. He knew, of course, that he couldn’t give someone HIV by just sneezing on them, and that his status was entirely confidential, but the situation made him irrational.And so Brad shut himself away in his bedroom, only occasionally emerging to go to school. He forgot all about his volleyball training. Sometimes, his parents would come and try and start a conversation, but Brad knew what they were really thinking, and had little interest in talking. He lived a lonely life split between his computer and the TV, imagining that the walls were slowly closing in to crush him.After about a month of this, Coach Stephens turned up to find out why he had quit volleyball. He thought Brad was ill and wanted to help. Brad had vowed to never tell anyone, but the hours of silence led him to blurt out: “I’m HIV-positive, okay? I’m going to die soon, so just leave me alone!” His coach looked at him with a serious expression and said: “No need to shout. You know, I’ve been HIV-positive for 16 years.” His words hit Brad like a bucket of cold water. He’d never realised that there might be other people like him out there. Coach Stephens then explained the idea of antiretroviral therapy, along with other things his doctor had told him about but which he hadn’t been able to take in. Brad cried like a baby.Coach Stephens promised to help him. He talked to his parents, explaining things they would otherwise never have understood. He got Brad back into volleyball training and introduced him to an HIV teenage support group, where he met new and very supportive people. Brad’s life is far from perfect now, but he’s learned to appreciate what life has given him. His parents are now more supportive, and are learning to be more open. He’s more responsible, both towards himself and others. All this is thanks to Coach Stephens, who gave Brad hope. Now, Brad wants to give someone else hope too. That’s why he’s decided to volunteer to help other teenagers escape the misery he found himself in.Brad has a way to sum up his situation: Instead of feeling HIV-positive, now he just feels positive. He knows he’s not alone, and that he has people around him to give him strength. And there’s one other good thing. Five years ago, he met a young woman who became his soulmate. Two years ago, she agreed to become his wife. Last week, she gave birth to his first, entirely healthy daughter. Brad has no way to express how happy he is. If only he could have known what lay ahead of him six years ago!How did I find out that I have HIV + 0:05I talked to my new doctor 0:55 Talk with my parents 1:15I locked myself alone 1:50Coach Stevens came to me 2:17I was crying like a baby 3:14I decided to volunteer 3:50A private one thing 4:15What's your story? Actually Happened want to hear it!Send your story time: [email protected] you liked this Actually happened animation and love storytime/ story time, true stories animated videos, watch our best video:Don't Judge A Book By It's Cover:https://bit.ly/2y4QPsz

    Accra: Researchers worried about emerging HIV infections in teenagers

    Accra: Researchers worried about emerging HIV infections in teenagers

    Story By Brad Subscribe: There was this guy called Brad, and one day he found something he could never have dreamed of - he was infected HIV-positive.He found out when he was 16 years old. Brad played for the volleyball team at his school. Every year, he had a medical before starting his training.That time, Brad was called into to see the school doctor for a private talk. It turned out to be a moment he would never forget. A lot of things were explained to him, but he only remembered that one phrase: “You’re HIV-positive.” The feeling was one of plummeting down from a very high building. “What is aids? This has to be a mistake,” he thought. But it wasn’t. He had no idea how he had caught it. Neither he nor any member of his family was part of one of the risk groups. He went over the issue in his mind for hours on end, but gave up after getting nowhere.Brad has little recollection of what he did over the next few weeks. He was angry at his doctor for smiling at him when she talked about his therapy. Brad should have listened to her more attentively, because she was explaining something important. All he got was that he had to take some pills to extend his miserable life for a few more years.Then there was that horrible talk with his parents. Brad loved them, but they had always been distant. Although they were kind about it when he told them, he sensed the disappointment in their eyes. He knew deep down that they thought HIV was something only bad people got.Brad expected no support from them. He became afraid to leave his house, because he was scared he’d be bullied or infect someone else. He knew, of course, that he couldn’t give someone HIV by just sneezing on them, and that his status was entirely confidential, but the situation made him irrational.And so Brad shut himself away in his bedroom, only occasionally emerging to go to school. He forgot all about his volleyball training. Sometimes, his parents would come and try and start a conversation, but Brad knew what they were really thinking, and had little interest in talking. He lived a lonely life split between his computer and the TV, imagining that the walls were slowly closing in to crush him.After about a month of this, Coach Stephens turned up to find out why he had quit volleyball. He thought Brad was ill and wanted to help. Brad had vowed to never tell anyone, but the hours of silence led him to blurt out: “I’m HIV-positive, okay? I’m going to die soon, so just leave me alone!” His coach looked at him with a serious expression and said: “No need to shout. You know, I’ve been HIV-positive for 16 years.” His words hit Brad like a bucket of cold water. He’d never realised that there might be other people like him out there. Coach Stephens then explained the idea of antiretroviral therapy, along with other things his doctor had told him about but which he hadn’t been able to take in. Brad cried like a baby.Coach Stephens promised to help him. He talked to his parents, explaining things they would otherwise never have understood. He got Brad back into volleyball training and introduced him to an HIV teenage support group, where he met new and very supportive people. Brad’s life is far from perfect now, but he’s learned to appreciate what life has given him. His parents are now more supportive, and are learning to be more open. He’s more responsible, both towards himself and others. All this is thanks to Coach Stephens, who gave Brad hope. Now, Brad wants to give someone else hope too. That’s why he’s decided to volunteer to help other teenagers escape the misery he found himself in.Brad has a way to sum up his situation: Instead of feeling HIV-positive, now he just feels positive. He knows he’s not alone, and that he has people around him to give him strength. And there’s one other good thing. Five years ago, he met a young woman who became his soulmate. Two years ago, she agreed to become his wife. Last week, she gave birth to his first, entirely healthy daughter. Brad has no way to express how happy he is. If only he could have known what lay ahead of him six years ago!How did I find out that I have HIV + 0:05I talked to my new doctor 0:55 Talk with my parents 1:15I locked myself alone 1:50Coach Stevens came to me 2:17I was crying like a baby 3:14I decided to volunteer 3:50A private one thing 4:15What's your story? Actually Happened want to hear it!Send your story time: [email protected] you liked this Actually happened animation and love storytime/ story time, true stories animated videos, watch our best video:Don't Judge A Book By It's Cover:https://bit.ly/2y4QPsz

    STUDY: 1 Teenage Girl is Infected by HIV Every 3 Minutes

    STUDY: 1 Teenage Girl is Infected by HIV Every 3 Minutes

    Story By Brad Subscribe: There was this guy called Brad, and one day he found something he could never have dreamed of - he was infected HIV-positive.He found out when he was 16 years old. Brad played for the volleyball team at his school. Every year, he had a medical before starting his training.That time, Brad was called into to see the school doctor for a private talk. It turned out to be a moment he would never forget. A lot of things were explained to him, but he only remembered that one phrase: “You’re HIV-positive.” The feeling was one of plummeting down from a very high building. “What is aids? This has to be a mistake,” he thought. But it wasn’t. He had no idea how he had caught it. Neither he nor any member of his family was part of one of the risk groups. He went over the issue in his mind for hours on end, but gave up after getting nowhere.Brad has little recollection of what he did over the next few weeks. He was angry at his doctor for smiling at him when she talked about his therapy. Brad should have listened to her more attentively, because she was explaining something important. All he got was that he had to take some pills to extend his miserable life for a few more years.Then there was that horrible talk with his parents. Brad loved them, but they had always been distant. Although they were kind about it when he told them, he sensed the disappointment in their eyes. He knew deep down that they thought HIV was something only bad people got.Brad expected no support from them. He became afraid to leave his house, because he was scared he’d be bullied or infect someone else. He knew, of course, that he couldn’t give someone HIV by just sneezing on them, and that his status was entirely confidential, but the situation made him irrational.And so Brad shut himself away in his bedroom, only occasionally emerging to go to school. He forgot all about his volleyball training. Sometimes, his parents would come and try and start a conversation, but Brad knew what they were really thinking, and had little interest in talking. He lived a lonely life split between his computer and the TV, imagining that the walls were slowly closing in to crush him.After about a month of this, Coach Stephens turned up to find out why he had quit volleyball. He thought Brad was ill and wanted to help. Brad had vowed to never tell anyone, but the hours of silence led him to blurt out: “I’m HIV-positive, okay? I’m going to die soon, so just leave me alone!” His coach looked at him with a serious expression and said: “No need to shout. You know, I’ve been HIV-positive for 16 years.” His words hit Brad like a bucket of cold water. He’d never realised that there might be other people like him out there. Coach Stephens then explained the idea of antiretroviral therapy, along with other things his doctor had told him about but which he hadn’t been able to take in. Brad cried like a baby.Coach Stephens promised to help him. He talked to his parents, explaining things they would otherwise never have understood. He got Brad back into volleyball training and introduced him to an HIV teenage support group, where he met new and very supportive people. Brad’s life is far from perfect now, but he’s learned to appreciate what life has given him. His parents are now more supportive, and are learning to be more open. He’s more responsible, both towards himself and others. All this is thanks to Coach Stephens, who gave Brad hope. Now, Brad wants to give someone else hope too. That’s why he’s decided to volunteer to help other teenagers escape the misery he found himself in.Brad has a way to sum up his situation: Instead of feeling HIV-positive, now he just feels positive. He knows he’s not alone, and that he has people around him to give him strength. And there’s one other good thing. Five years ago, he met a young woman who became his soulmate. Two years ago, she agreed to become his wife. Last week, she gave birth to his first, entirely healthy daughter. Brad has no way to express how happy he is. If only he could have known what lay ahead of him six years ago!How did I find out that I have HIV + 0:05I talked to my new doctor 0:55 Talk with my parents 1:15I locked myself alone 1:50Coach Stevens came to me 2:17I was crying like a baby 3:14I decided to volunteer 3:50A private one thing 4:15What's your story? Actually Happened want to hear it!Send your story time: [email protected] you liked this Actually happened animation and love storytime/ story time, true stories animated videos, watch our best video:Don't Judge A Book By It's Cover:https://bit.ly/2y4QPsz

    A potential cure for HIV The Economist

    A potential cure for HIV The Economist

    Story By Brad Subscribe: There was this guy called Brad, and one day he found something he could never have dreamed of - he was infected HIV-positive.He found out when he was 16 years old. Brad played for the volleyball team at his school. Every year, he had a medical before starting his training.That time, Brad was called into to see the school doctor for a private talk. It turned out to be a moment he would never forget. A lot of things were explained to him, but he only remembered that one phrase: “You’re HIV-positive.” The feeling was one of plummeting down from a very high building. “What is aids? This has to be a mistake,” he thought. But it wasn’t. He had no idea how he had caught it. Neither he nor any member of his family was part of one of the risk groups. He went over the issue in his mind for hours on end, but gave up after getting nowhere.Brad has little recollection of what he did over the next few weeks. He was angry at his doctor for smiling at him when she talked about his therapy. Brad should have listened to her more attentively, because she was explaining something important. All he got was that he had to take some pills to extend his miserable life for a few more years.Then there was that horrible talk with his parents. Brad loved them, but they had always been distant. Although they were kind about it when he told them, he sensed the disappointment in their eyes. He knew deep down that they thought HIV was something only bad people got.Brad expected no support from them. He became afraid to leave his house, because he was scared he’d be bullied or infect someone else. He knew, of course, that he couldn’t give someone HIV by just sneezing on them, and that his status was entirely confidential, but the situation made him irrational.And so Brad shut himself away in his bedroom, only occasionally emerging to go to school. He forgot all about his volleyball training. Sometimes, his parents would come and try and start a conversation, but Brad knew what they were really thinking, and had little interest in talking. He lived a lonely life split between his computer and the TV, imagining that the walls were slowly closing in to crush him.After about a month of this, Coach Stephens turned up to find out why he had quit volleyball. He thought Brad was ill and wanted to help. Brad had vowed to never tell anyone, but the hours of silence led him to blurt out: “I’m HIV-positive, okay? I’m going to die soon, so just leave me alone!” His coach looked at him with a serious expression and said: “No need to shout. You know, I’ve been HIV-positive for 16 years.” His words hit Brad like a bucket of cold water. He’d never realised that there might be other people like him out there. Coach Stephens then explained the idea of antiretroviral therapy, along with other things his doctor had told him about but which he hadn’t been able to take in. Brad cried like a baby.Coach Stephens promised to help him. He talked to his parents, explaining things they would otherwise never have understood. He got Brad back into volleyball training and introduced him to an HIV teenage support group, where he met new and very supportive people. Brad’s life is far from perfect now, but he’s learned to appreciate what life has given him. His parents are now more supportive, and are learning to be more open. He’s more responsible, both towards himself and others. All this is thanks to Coach Stephens, who gave Brad hope. Now, Brad wants to give someone else hope too. That’s why he’s decided to volunteer to help other teenagers escape the misery he found himself in.Brad has a way to sum up his situation: Instead of feeling HIV-positive, now he just feels positive. He knows he’s not alone, and that he has people around him to give him strength. And there’s one other good thing. Five years ago, he met a young woman who became his soulmate. Two years ago, she agreed to become his wife. Last week, she gave birth to his first, entirely healthy daughter. Brad has no way to express how happy he is. If only he could have known what lay ahead of him six years ago!How did I find out that I have HIV + 0:05I talked to my new doctor 0:55 Talk with my parents 1:15I locked myself alone 1:50Coach Stevens came to me 2:17I was crying like a baby 3:14I decided to volunteer 3:50A private one thing 4:15What's your story? Actually Happened want to hear it!Send your story time: [email protected] you liked this Actually happened animation and love storytime/ story time, true stories animated videos, watch our best video:Don't Judge A Book By It's Cover:https://bit.ly/2y4QPsz

    The Origin of HIV Aids - Everyone has Aids HIV

    The Origin of HIV Aids - Everyone has Aids HIV

    Story By Brad Subscribe: There was this guy called Brad, and one day he found something he could never have dreamed of - he was infected HIV-positive.He found out when he was 16 years old. Brad played for the volleyball team at his school. Every year, he had a medical before starting his training.That time, Brad was called into to see the school doctor for a private talk. It turned out to be a moment he would never forget. A lot of things were explained to him, but he only remembered that one phrase: “You’re HIV-positive.” The feeling was one of plummeting down from a very high building. “What is aids? This has to be a mistake,” he thought. But it wasn’t. He had no idea how he had caught it. Neither he nor any member of his family was part of one of the risk groups. He went over the issue in his mind for hours on end, but gave up after getting nowhere.Brad has little recollection of what he did over the next few weeks. He was angry at his doctor for smiling at him when she talked about his therapy. Brad should have listened to her more attentively, because she was explaining something important. All he got was that he had to take some pills to extend his miserable life for a few more years.Then there was that horrible talk with his parents. Brad loved them, but they had always been distant. Although they were kind about it when he told them, he sensed the disappointment in their eyes. He knew deep down that they thought HIV was something only bad people got.Brad expected no support from them. He became afraid to leave his house, because he was scared he’d be bullied or infect someone else. He knew, of course, that he couldn’t give someone HIV by just sneezing on them, and that his status was entirely confidential, but the situation made him irrational.And so Brad shut himself away in his bedroom, only occasionally emerging to go to school. He forgot all about his volleyball training. Sometimes, his parents would come and try and start a conversation, but Brad knew what they were really thinking, and had little interest in talking. He lived a lonely life split between his computer and the TV, imagining that the walls were slowly closing in to crush him.After about a month of this, Coach Stephens turned up to find out why he had quit volleyball. He thought Brad was ill and wanted to help. Brad had vowed to never tell anyone, but the hours of silence led him to blurt out: “I’m HIV-positive, okay? I’m going to die soon, so just leave me alone!” His coach looked at him with a serious expression and said: “No need to shout. You know, I’ve been HIV-positive for 16 years.” His words hit Brad like a bucket of cold water. He’d never realised that there might be other people like him out there. Coach Stephens then explained the idea of antiretroviral therapy, along with other things his doctor had told him about but which he hadn’t been able to take in. Brad cried like a baby.Coach Stephens promised to help him. He talked to his parents, explaining things they would otherwise never have understood. He got Brad back into volleyball training and introduced him to an HIV teenage support group, where he met new and very supportive people. Brad’s life is far from perfect now, but he’s learned to appreciate what life has given him. His parents are now more supportive, and are learning to be more open. He’s more responsible, both towards himself and others. All this is thanks to Coach Stephens, who gave Brad hope. Now, Brad wants to give someone else hope too. That’s why he’s decided to volunteer to help other teenagers escape the misery he found himself in.Brad has a way to sum up his situation: Instead of feeling HIV-positive, now he just feels positive. He knows he’s not alone, and that he has people around him to give him strength. And there’s one other good thing. Five years ago, he met a young woman who became his soulmate. Two years ago, she agreed to become his wife. Last week, she gave birth to his first, entirely healthy daughter. Brad has no way to express how happy he is. If only he could have known what lay ahead of him six years ago!How did I find out that I have HIV + 0:05I talked to my new doctor 0:55 Talk with my parents 1:15I locked myself alone 1:50Coach Stevens came to me 2:17I was crying like a baby 3:14I decided to volunteer 3:50A private one thing 4:15What's your story? Actually Happened want to hear it!Send your story time: [email protected] you liked this Actually happened animation and love storytime/ story time, true stories animated videos, watch our best video:Don't Judge A Book By It's Cover:https://bit.ly/2y4QPsz

    WHO: In our hands - HIV self-testing in Malawi

    WHO: In our hands - HIV self-testing in Malawi

    Story By Brad Subscribe: There was this guy called Brad, and one day he found something he could never have dreamed of - he was infected HIV-positive.He found out when he was 16 years old. Brad played for the volleyball team at his school. Every year, he had a medical before starting his training.That time, Brad was called into to see the school doctor for a private talk. It turned out to be a moment he would never forget. A lot of things were explained to him, but he only remembered that one phrase: “You’re HIV-positive.” The feeling was one of plummeting down from a very high building. “What is aids? This has to be a mistake,” he thought. But it wasn’t. He had no idea how he had caught it. Neither he nor any member of his family was part of one of the risk groups. He went over the issue in his mind for hours on end, but gave up after getting nowhere.Brad has little recollection of what he did over the next few weeks. He was angry at his doctor for smiling at him when she talked about his therapy. Brad should have listened to her more attentively, because she was explaining something important. All he got was that he had to take some pills to extend his miserable life for a few more years.Then there was that horrible talk with his parents. Brad loved them, but they had always been distant. Although they were kind about it when he told them, he sensed the disappointment in their eyes. He knew deep down that they thought HIV was something only bad people got.Brad expected no support from them. He became afraid to leave his house, because he was scared he’d be bullied or infect someone else. He knew, of course, that he couldn’t give someone HIV by just sneezing on them, and that his status was entirely confidential, but the situation made him irrational.And so Brad shut himself away in his bedroom, only occasionally emerging to go to school. He forgot all about his volleyball training. Sometimes, his parents would come and try and start a conversation, but Brad knew what they were really thinking, and had little interest in talking. He lived a lonely life split between his computer and the TV, imagining that the walls were slowly closing in to crush him.After about a month of this, Coach Stephens turned up to find out why he had quit volleyball. He thought Brad was ill and wanted to help. Brad had vowed to never tell anyone, but the hours of silence led him to blurt out: “I’m HIV-positive, okay? I’m going to die soon, so just leave me alone!” His coach looked at him with a serious expression and said: “No need to shout. You know, I’ve been HIV-positive for 16 years.” His words hit Brad like a bucket of cold water. He’d never realised that there might be other people like him out there. Coach Stephens then explained the idea of antiretroviral therapy, along with other things his doctor had told him about but which he hadn’t been able to take in. Brad cried like a baby.Coach Stephens promised to help him. He talked to his parents, explaining things they would otherwise never have understood. He got Brad back into volleyball training and introduced him to an HIV teenage support group, where he met new and very supportive people. Brad’s life is far from perfect now, but he’s learned to appreciate what life has given him. His parents are now more supportive, and are learning to be more open. He’s more responsible, both towards himself and others. All this is thanks to Coach Stephens, who gave Brad hope. Now, Brad wants to give someone else hope too. That’s why he’s decided to volunteer to help other teenagers escape the misery he found himself in.Brad has a way to sum up his situation: Instead of feeling HIV-positive, now he just feels positive. He knows he’s not alone, and that he has people around him to give him strength. And there’s one other good thing. Five years ago, he met a young woman who became his soulmate. Two years ago, she agreed to become his wife. Last week, she gave birth to his first, entirely healthy daughter. Brad has no way to express how happy he is. If only he could have known what lay ahead of him six years ago!How did I find out that I have HIV + 0:05I talked to my new doctor 0:55 Talk with my parents 1:15I locked myself alone 1:50Coach Stevens came to me 2:17I was crying like a baby 3:14I decided to volunteer 3:50A private one thing 4:15What's your story? Actually Happened want to hear it!Send your story time: [email protected] you liked this Actually happened animation and love storytime/ story time, true stories animated videos, watch our best video:Don't Judge A Book By It's Cover:https://bit.ly/2y4QPsz

    I Got Pregnant At 15 And My BF Is Shocked

    I Got Pregnant At 15 And My BF Is Shocked

    Story By Brad Subscribe: There was this guy called Brad, and one day he found something he could never have dreamed of - he was infected HIV-positive.He found out when he was 16 years old. Brad played for the volleyball team at his school. Every year, he had a medical before starting his training.That time, Brad was called into to see the school doctor for a private talk. It turned out to be a moment he would never forget. A lot of things were explained to him, but he only remembered that one phrase: “You’re HIV-positive.” The feeling was one of plummeting down from a very high building. “What is aids? This has to be a mistake,” he thought. But it wasn’t. He had no idea how he had caught it. Neither he nor any member of his family was part of one of the risk groups. He went over the issue in his mind for hours on end, but gave up after getting nowhere.Brad has little recollection of what he did over the next few weeks. He was angry at his doctor for smiling at him when she talked about his therapy. Brad should have listened to her more attentively, because she was explaining something important. All he got was that he had to take some pills to extend his miserable life for a few more years.Then there was that horrible talk with his parents. Brad loved them, but they had always been distant. Although they were kind about it when he told them, he sensed the disappointment in their eyes. He knew deep down that they thought HIV was something only bad people got.Brad expected no support from them. He became afraid to leave his house, because he was scared he’d be bullied or infect someone else. He knew, of course, that he couldn’t give someone HIV by just sneezing on them, and that his status was entirely confidential, but the situation made him irrational.And so Brad shut himself away in his bedroom, only occasionally emerging to go to school. He forgot all about his volleyball training. Sometimes, his parents would come and try and start a conversation, but Brad knew what they were really thinking, and had little interest in talking. He lived a lonely life split between his computer and the TV, imagining that the walls were slowly closing in to crush him.After about a month of this, Coach Stephens turned up to find out why he had quit volleyball. He thought Brad was ill and wanted to help. Brad had vowed to never tell anyone, but the hours of silence led him to blurt out: “I’m HIV-positive, okay? I’m going to die soon, so just leave me alone!” His coach looked at him with a serious expression and said: “No need to shout. You know, I’ve been HIV-positive for 16 years.” His words hit Brad like a bucket of cold water. He’d never realised that there might be other people like him out there. Coach Stephens then explained the idea of antiretroviral therapy, along with other things his doctor had told him about but which he hadn’t been able to take in. Brad cried like a baby.Coach Stephens promised to help him. He talked to his parents, explaining things they would otherwise never have understood. He got Brad back into volleyball training and introduced him to an HIV teenage support group, where he met new and very supportive people. Brad’s life is far from perfect now, but he’s learned to appreciate what life has given him. His parents are now more supportive, and are learning to be more open. He’s more responsible, both towards himself and others. All this is thanks to Coach Stephens, who gave Brad hope. Now, Brad wants to give someone else hope too. That’s why he’s decided to volunteer to help other teenagers escape the misery he found himself in.Brad has a way to sum up his situation: Instead of feeling HIV-positive, now he just feels positive. He knows he’s not alone, and that he has people around him to give him strength. And there’s one other good thing. Five years ago, he met a young woman who became his soulmate. Two years ago, she agreed to become his wife. Last week, she gave birth to his first, entirely healthy daughter. Brad has no way to express how happy he is. If only he could have known what lay ahead of him six years ago!How did I find out that I have HIV + 0:05I talked to my new doctor 0:55 Talk with my parents 1:15I locked myself alone 1:50Coach Stevens came to me 2:17I was crying like a baby 3:14I decided to volunteer 3:50A private one thing 4:15What's your story? Actually Happened want to hear it!Send your story time: [email protected] you liked this Actually happened animation and love storytime/ story time, true stories animated videos, watch our best video:Don't Judge A Book By It's Cover:https://bit.ly/2y4QPsz

    I Took Drugs To Study Well But Everything Went Wrong

    I Took Drugs To Study Well But Everything Went Wrong

    Story By Brad Subscribe: There was this guy called Brad, and one day he found something he could never have dreamed of - he was infected HIV-positive.He found out when he was 16 years old. Brad played for the volleyball team at his school. Every year, he had a medical before starting his training.That time, Brad was called into to see the school doctor for a private talk. It turned out to be a moment he would never forget. A lot of things were explained to him, but he only remembered that one phrase: “You’re HIV-positive.” The feeling was one of plummeting down from a very high building. “What is aids? This has to be a mistake,” he thought. But it wasn’t. He had no idea how he had caught it. Neither he nor any member of his family was part of one of the risk groups. He went over the issue in his mind for hours on end, but gave up after getting nowhere.Brad has little recollection of what he did over the next few weeks. He was angry at his doctor for smiling at him when she talked about his therapy. Brad should have listened to her more attentively, because she was explaining something important. All he got was that he had to take some pills to extend his miserable life for a few more years.Then there was that horrible talk with his parents. Brad loved them, but they had always been distant. Although they were kind about it when he told them, he sensed the disappointment in their eyes. He knew deep down that they thought HIV was something only bad people got.Brad expected no support from them. He became afraid to leave his house, because he was scared he’d be bullied or infect someone else. He knew, of course, that he couldn’t give someone HIV by just sneezing on them, and that his status was entirely confidential, but the situation made him irrational.And so Brad shut himself away in his bedroom, only occasionally emerging to go to school. He forgot all about his volleyball training. Sometimes, his parents would come and try and start a conversation, but Brad knew what they were really thinking, and had little interest in talking. He lived a lonely life split between his computer and the TV, imagining that the walls were slowly closing in to crush him.After about a month of this, Coach Stephens turned up to find out why he had quit volleyball. He thought Brad was ill and wanted to help. Brad had vowed to never tell anyone, but the hours of silence led him to blurt out: “I’m HIV-positive, okay? I’m going to die soon, so just leave me alone!” His coach looked at him with a serious expression and said: “No need to shout. You know, I’ve been HIV-positive for 16 years.” His words hit Brad like a bucket of cold water. He’d never realised that there might be other people like him out there. Coach Stephens then explained the idea of antiretroviral therapy, along with other things his doctor had told him about but which he hadn’t been able to take in. Brad cried like a baby.Coach Stephens promised to help him. He talked to his parents, explaining things they would otherwise never have understood. He got Brad back into volleyball training and introduced him to an HIV teenage support group, where he met new and very supportive people. Brad’s life is far from perfect now, but he’s learned to appreciate what life has given him. His parents are now more supportive, and are learning to be more open. He’s more responsible, both towards himself and others. All this is thanks to Coach Stephens, who gave Brad hope. Now, Brad wants to give someone else hope too. That’s why he’s decided to volunteer to help other teenagers escape the misery he found himself in.Brad has a way to sum up his situation: Instead of feeling HIV-positive, now he just feels positive. He knows he’s not alone, and that he has people around him to give him strength. And there’s one other good thing. Five years ago, he met a young woman who became his soulmate. Two years ago, she agreed to become his wife. Last week, she gave birth to his first, entirely healthy daughter. Brad has no way to express how happy he is. If only he could have known what lay ahead of him six years ago!How did I find out that I have HIV + 0:05I talked to my new doctor 0:55 Talk with my parents 1:15I locked myself alone 1:50Coach Stevens came to me 2:17I was crying like a baby 3:14I decided to volunteer 3:50A private one thing 4:15What's your story? Actually Happened want to hear it!Send your story time: [email protected] you liked this Actually happened animation and love storytime/ story time, true stories animated videos, watch our best video:Don't Judge A Book By It's Cover:https://bit.ly/2y4QPsz

    I Fell In Love With A Gay And Didn't Regret It

    I Fell In Love With A Gay And Didn't Regret It

    Story By Brad Subscribe: There was this guy called Brad, and one day he found something he could never have dreamed of - he was infected HIV-positive.He found out when he was 16 years old. Brad played for the volleyball team at his school. Every year, he had a medical before starting his training.That time, Brad was called into to see the school doctor for a private talk. It turned out to be a moment he would never forget. A lot of things were explained to him, but he only remembered that one phrase: “You’re HIV-positive.” The feeling was one of plummeting down from a very high building. “What is aids? This has to be a mistake,” he thought. But it wasn’t. He had no idea how he had caught it. Neither he nor any member of his family was part of one of the risk groups. He went over the issue in his mind for hours on end, but gave up after getting nowhere.Brad has little recollection of what he did over the next few weeks. He was angry at his doctor for smiling at him when she talked about his therapy. Brad should have listened to her more attentively, because she was explaining something important. All he got was that he had to take some pills to extend his miserable life for a few more years.Then there was that horrible talk with his parents. Brad loved them, but they had always been distant. Although they were kind about it when he told them, he sensed the disappointment in their eyes. He knew deep down that they thought HIV was something only bad people got.Brad expected no support from them. He became afraid to leave his house, because he was scared he’d be bullied or infect someone else. He knew, of course, that he couldn’t give someone HIV by just sneezing on them, and that his status was entirely confidential, but the situation made him irrational.And so Brad shut himself away in his bedroom, only occasionally emerging to go to school. He forgot all about his volleyball training. Sometimes, his parents would come and try and start a conversation, but Brad knew what they were really thinking, and had little interest in talking. He lived a lonely life split between his computer and the TV, imagining that the walls were slowly closing in to crush him.After about a month of this, Coach Stephens turned up to find out why he had quit volleyball. He thought Brad was ill and wanted to help. Brad had vowed to never tell anyone, but the hours of silence led him to blurt out: “I’m HIV-positive, okay? I’m going to die soon, so just leave me alone!” His coach looked at him with a serious expression and said: “No need to shout. You know, I’ve been HIV-positive for 16 years.” His words hit Brad like a bucket of cold water. He’d never realised that there might be other people like him out there. Coach Stephens then explained the idea of antiretroviral therapy, along with other things his doctor had told him about but which he hadn’t been able to take in. Brad cried like a baby.Coach Stephens promised to help him. He talked to his parents, explaining things they would otherwise never have understood. He got Brad back into volleyball training and introduced him to an HIV teenage support group, where he met new and very supportive people. Brad’s life is far from perfect now, but he’s learned to appreciate what life has given him. His parents are now more supportive, and are learning to be more open. He’s more responsible, both towards himself and others. All this is thanks to Coach Stephens, who gave Brad hope. Now, Brad wants to give someone else hope too. That’s why he’s decided to volunteer to help other teenagers escape the misery he found himself in.Brad has a way to sum up his situation: Instead of feeling HIV-positive, now he just feels positive. He knows he’s not alone, and that he has people around him to give him strength. And there’s one other good thing. Five years ago, he met a young woman who became his soulmate. Two years ago, she agreed to become his wife. Last week, she gave birth to his first, entirely healthy daughter. Brad has no way to express how happy he is. If only he could have known what lay ahead of him six years ago!How did I find out that I have HIV + 0:05I talked to my new doctor 0:55 Talk with my parents 1:15I locked myself alone 1:50Coach Stevens came to me 2:17I was crying like a baby 3:14I decided to volunteer 3:50A private one thing 4:15What's your story? Actually Happened want to hear it!Send your story time: [email protected] you liked this Actually happened animation and love storytime/ story time, true stories animated videos, watch our best video:Don't Judge A Book By It's Cover:https://bit.ly/2y4QPsz

    Our treatment of HIV has advanced. Why hasn't the stigma changed? Arik Hartmann

    Our treatment of HIV has advanced. Why hasn't the stigma changed? Arik Hartmann

    Story By Brad Subscribe: There was this guy called Brad, and one day he found something he could never have dreamed of - he was infected HIV-positive.He found out when he was 16 years old. Brad played for the volleyball team at his school. Every year, he had a medical before starting his training.That time, Brad was called into to see the school doctor for a private talk. It turned out to be a moment he would never forget. A lot of things were explained to him, but he only remembered that one phrase: “You’re HIV-positive.” The feeling was one of plummeting down from a very high building. “What is aids? This has to be a mistake,” he thought. But it wasn’t. He had no idea how he had caught it. Neither he nor any member of his family was part of one of the risk groups. He went over the issue in his mind for hours on end, but gave up after getting nowhere.Brad has little recollection of what he did over the next few weeks. He was angry at his doctor for smiling at him when she talked about his therapy. Brad should have listened to her more attentively, because she was explaining something important. All he got was that he had to take some pills to extend his miserable life for a few more years.Then there was that horrible talk with his parents. Brad loved them, but they had always been distant. Although they were kind about it when he told them, he sensed the disappointment in their eyes. He knew deep down that they thought HIV was something only bad people got.Brad expected no support from them. He became afraid to leave his house, because he was scared he’d be bullied or infect someone else. He knew, of course, that he couldn’t give someone HIV by just sneezing on them, and that his status was entirely confidential, but the situation made him irrational.And so Brad shut himself away in his bedroom, only occasionally emerging to go to school. He forgot all about his volleyball training. Sometimes, his parents would come and try and start a conversation, but Brad knew what they were really thinking, and had little interest in talking. He lived a lonely life split between his computer and the TV, imagining that the walls were slowly closing in to crush him.After about a month of this, Coach Stephens turned up to find out why he had quit volleyball. He thought Brad was ill and wanted to help. Brad had vowed to never tell anyone, but the hours of silence led him to blurt out: “I’m HIV-positive, okay? I’m going to die soon, so just leave me alone!” His coach looked at him with a serious expression and said: “No need to shout. You know, I’ve been HIV-positive for 16 years.” His words hit Brad like a bucket of cold water. He’d never realised that there might be other people like him out there. Coach Stephens then explained the idea of antiretroviral therapy, along with other things his doctor had told him about but which he hadn’t been able to take in. Brad cried like a baby.Coach Stephens promised to help him. He talked to his parents, explaining things they would otherwise never have understood. He got Brad back into volleyball training and introduced him to an HIV teenage support group, where he met new and very supportive people. Brad’s life is far from perfect now, but he’s learned to appreciate what life has given him. His parents are now more supportive, and are learning to be more open. He’s more responsible, both towards himself and others. All this is thanks to Coach Stephens, who gave Brad hope. Now, Brad wants to give someone else hope too. That’s why he’s decided to volunteer to help other teenagers escape the misery he found himself in.Brad has a way to sum up his situation: Instead of feeling HIV-positive, now he just feels positive. He knows he’s not alone, and that he has people around him to give him strength. And there’s one other good thing. Five years ago, he met a young woman who became his soulmate. Two years ago, she agreed to become his wife. Last week, she gave birth to his first, entirely healthy daughter. Brad has no way to express how happy he is. If only he could have known what lay ahead of him six years ago!How did I find out that I have HIV + 0:05I talked to my new doctor 0:55 Talk with my parents 1:15I locked myself alone 1:50Coach Stevens came to me 2:17I was crying like a baby 3:14I decided to volunteer 3:50A private one thing 4:15What's your story? Actually Happened want to hear it!Send your story time: [email protected] you liked this Actually happened animation and love storytime/ story time, true stories animated videos, watch our best video:Don't Judge A Book By It's Cover:https://bit.ly/2y4QPsz

    The Origin of HIV Aids - The best documentary - Channel 4

    The Origin of HIV Aids - The best documentary - Channel 4

    Story By Brad Subscribe: There was this guy called Brad, and one day he found something he could never have dreamed of - he was infected HIV-positive.He found out when he was 16 years old. Brad played for the volleyball team at his school. Every year, he had a medical before starting his training.That time, Brad was called into to see the school doctor for a private talk. It turned out to be a moment he would never forget. A lot of things were explained to him, but he only remembered that one phrase: “You’re HIV-positive.” The feeling was one of plummeting down from a very high building. “What is aids? This has to be a mistake,” he thought. But it wasn’t. He had no idea how he had caught it. Neither he nor any member of his family was part of one of the risk groups. He went over the issue in his mind for hours on end, but gave up after getting nowhere.Brad has little recollection of what he did over the next few weeks. He was angry at his doctor for smiling at him when she talked about his therapy. Brad should have listened to her more attentively, because she was explaining something important. All he got was that he had to take some pills to extend his miserable life for a few more years.Then there was that horrible talk with his parents. Brad loved them, but they had always been distant. Although they were kind about it when he told them, he sensed the disappointment in their eyes. He knew deep down that they thought HIV was something only bad people got.Brad expected no support from them. He became afraid to leave his house, because he was scared he’d be bullied or infect someone else. He knew, of course, that he couldn’t give someone HIV by just sneezing on them, and that his status was entirely confidential, but the situation made him irrational.And so Brad shut himself away in his bedroom, only occasionally emerging to go to school. He forgot all about his volleyball training. Sometimes, his parents would come and try and start a conversation, but Brad knew what they were really thinking, and had little interest in talking. He lived a lonely life split between his computer and the TV, imagining that the walls were slowly closing in to crush him.After about a month of this, Coach Stephens turned up to find out why he had quit volleyball. He thought Brad was ill and wanted to help. Brad had vowed to never tell anyone, but the hours of silence led him to blurt out: “I’m HIV-positive, okay? I’m going to die soon, so just leave me alone!” His coach looked at him with a serious expression and said: “No need to shout. You know, I’ve been HIV-positive for 16 years.” His words hit Brad like a bucket of cold water. He’d never realised that there might be other people like him out there. Coach Stephens then explained the idea of antiretroviral therapy, along with other things his doctor had told him about but which he hadn’t been able to take in. Brad cried like a baby.Coach Stephens promised to help him. He talked to his parents, explaining things they would otherwise never have understood. He got Brad back into volleyball training and introduced him to an HIV teenage support group, where he met new and very supportive people. Brad’s life is far from perfect now, but he’s learned to appreciate what life has given him. His parents are now more supportive, and are learning to be more open. He’s more responsible, both towards himself and others. All this is thanks to Coach Stephens, who gave Brad hope. Now, Brad wants to give someone else hope too. That’s why he’s decided to volunteer to help other teenagers escape the misery he found himself in.Brad has a way to sum up his situation: Instead of feeling HIV-positive, now he just feels positive. He knows he’s not alone, and that he has people around him to give him strength. And there’s one other good thing. Five years ago, he met a young woman who became his soulmate. Two years ago, she agreed to become his wife. Last week, she gave birth to his first, entirely healthy daughter. Brad has no way to express how happy he is. If only he could have known what lay ahead of him six years ago!How did I find out that I have HIV + 0:05I talked to my new doctor 0:55 Talk with my parents 1:15I locked myself alone 1:50Coach Stevens came to me 2:17I was crying like a baby 3:14I decided to volunteer 3:50A private one thing 4:15What's your story? Actually Happened want to hear it!Send your story time: [email protected] you liked this Actually happened animation and love storytime/ story time, true stories animated videos, watch our best video:Don't Judge A Book By It's Cover:https://bit.ly/2y4QPsz

    HIV and Aids in Jamaica Talk Up Yout Tv Show

    HIV and Aids in Jamaica Talk Up Yout Tv Show

    Story By Brad Subscribe: There was this guy called Brad, and one day he found something he could never have dreamed of - he was infected HIV-positive.He found out when he was 16 years old. Brad played for the volleyball team at his school. Every year, he had a medical before starting his training.That time, Brad was called into to see the school doctor for a private talk. It turned out to be a moment he would never forget. A lot of things were explained to him, but he only remembered that one phrase: “You’re HIV-positive.” The feeling was one of plummeting down from a very high building. “What is aids? This has to be a mistake,” he thought. But it wasn’t. He had no idea how he had caught it. Neither he nor any member of his family was part of one of the risk groups. He went over the issue in his mind for hours on end, but gave up after getting nowhere.Brad has little recollection of what he did over the next few weeks. He was angry at his doctor for smiling at him when she talked about his therapy. Brad should have listened to her more attentively, because she was explaining something important. All he got was that he had to take some pills to extend his miserable life for a few more years.Then there was that horrible talk with his parents. Brad loved them, but they had always been distant. Although they were kind about it when he told them, he sensed the disappointment in their eyes. He knew deep down that they thought HIV was something only bad people got.Brad expected no support from them. He became afraid to leave his house, because he was scared he’d be bullied or infect someone else. He knew, of course, that he couldn’t give someone HIV by just sneezing on them, and that his status was entirely confidential, but the situation made him irrational.And so Brad shut himself away in his bedroom, only occasionally emerging to go to school. He forgot all about his volleyball training. Sometimes, his parents would come and try and start a conversation, but Brad knew what they were really thinking, and had little interest in talking. He lived a lonely life split between his computer and the TV, imagining that the walls were slowly closing in to crush him.After about a month of this, Coach Stephens turned up to find out why he had quit volleyball. He thought Brad was ill and wanted to help. Brad had vowed to never tell anyone, but the hours of silence led him to blurt out: “I’m HIV-positive, okay? I’m going to die soon, so just leave me alone!” His coach looked at him with a serious expression and said: “No need to shout. You know, I’ve been HIV-positive for 16 years.” His words hit Brad like a bucket of cold water. He’d never realised that there might be other people like him out there. Coach Stephens then explained the idea of antiretroviral therapy, along with other things his doctor had told him about but which he hadn’t been able to take in. Brad cried like a baby.Coach Stephens promised to help him. He talked to his parents, explaining things they would otherwise never have understood. He got Brad back into volleyball training and introduced him to an HIV teenage support group, where he met new and very supportive people. Brad’s life is far from perfect now, but he’s learned to appreciate what life has given him. His parents are now more supportive, and are learning to be more open. He’s more responsible, both towards himself and others. All this is thanks to Coach Stephens, who gave Brad hope. Now, Brad wants to give someone else hope too. That’s why he’s decided to volunteer to help other teenagers escape the misery he found himself in.Brad has a way to sum up his situation: Instead of feeling HIV-positive, now he just feels positive. He knows he’s not alone, and that he has people around him to give him strength. And there’s one other good thing. Five years ago, he met a young woman who became his soulmate. Two years ago, she agreed to become his wife. Last week, she gave birth to his first, entirely healthy daughter. Brad has no way to express how happy he is. If only he could have known what lay ahead of him six years ago!How did I find out that I have HIV + 0:05I talked to my new doctor 0:55 Talk with my parents 1:15I locked myself alone 1:50Coach Stevens came to me 2:17I was crying like a baby 3:14I decided to volunteer 3:50A private one thing 4:15What's your story? Actually Happened want to hear it!Send your story time: [email protected] you liked this Actually happened animation and love storytime/ story time, true stories animated videos, watch our best video:Don't Judge A Book By It's Cover:https://bit.ly/2y4QPsz

    HIV AIDS Education and Awareness

    HIV AIDS Education and Awareness

    Story By Brad Subscribe: There was this guy called Brad, and one day he found something he could never have dreamed of - he was infected HIV-positive.He found out when he was 16 years old. Brad played for the volleyball team at his school. Every year, he had a medical before starting his training.That time, Brad was called into to see the school doctor for a private talk. It turned out to be a moment he would never forget. A lot of things were explained to him, but he only remembered that one phrase: “You’re HIV-positive.” The feeling was one of plummeting down from a very high building. “What is aids? This has to be a mistake,” he thought. But it wasn’t. He had no idea how he had caught it. Neither he nor any member of his family was part of one of the risk groups. He went over the issue in his mind for hours on end, but gave up after getting nowhere.Brad has little recollection of what he did over the next few weeks. He was angry at his doctor for smiling at him when she talked about his therapy. Brad should have listened to her more attentively, because she was explaining something important. All he got was that he had to take some pills to extend his miserable life for a few more years.Then there was that horrible talk with his parents. Brad loved them, but they had always been distant. Although they were kind about it when he told them, he sensed the disappointment in their eyes. He knew deep down that they thought HIV was something only bad people got.Brad expected no support from them. He became afraid to leave his house, because he was scared he’d be bullied or infect someone else. He knew, of course, that he couldn’t give someone HIV by just sneezing on them, and that his status was entirely confidential, but the situation made him irrational.And so Brad shut himself away in his bedroom, only occasionally emerging to go to school. He forgot all about his volleyball training. Sometimes, his parents would come and try and start a conversation, but Brad knew what they were really thinking, and had little interest in talking. He lived a lonely life split between his computer and the TV, imagining that the walls were slowly closing in to crush him.After about a month of this, Coach Stephens turned up to find out why he had quit volleyball. He thought Brad was ill and wanted to help. Brad had vowed to never tell anyone, but the hours of silence led him to blurt out: “I’m HIV-positive, okay? I’m going to die soon, so just leave me alone!” His coach looked at him with a serious expression and said: “No need to shout. You know, I’ve been HIV-positive for 16 years.” His words hit Brad like a bucket of cold water. He’d never realised that there might be other people like him out there. Coach Stephens then explained the idea of antiretroviral therapy, along with other things his doctor had told him about but which he hadn’t been able to take in. Brad cried like a baby.Coach Stephens promised to help him. He talked to his parents, explaining things they would otherwise never have understood. He got Brad back into volleyball training and introduced him to an HIV teenage support group, where he met new and very supportive people. Brad’s life is far from perfect now, but he’s learned to appreciate what life has given him. His parents are now more supportive, and are learning to be more open. He’s more responsible, both towards himself and others. All this is thanks to Coach Stephens, who gave Brad hope. Now, Brad wants to give someone else hope too. That’s why he’s decided to volunteer to help other teenagers escape the misery he found himself in.Brad has a way to sum up his situation: Instead of feeling HIV-positive, now he just feels positive. He knows he’s not alone, and that he has people around him to give him strength. And there’s one other good thing. Five years ago, he met a young woman who became his soulmate. Two years ago, she agreed to become his wife. Last week, she gave birth to his first, entirely healthy daughter. Brad has no way to express how happy he is. If only he could have known what lay ahead of him six years ago!How did I find out that I have HIV + 0:05I talked to my new doctor 0:55 Talk with my parents 1:15I locked myself alone 1:50Coach Stevens came to me 2:17I was crying like a baby 3:14I decided to volunteer 3:50A private one thing 4:15What's your story? Actually Happened want to hear it!Send your story time: [email protected] you liked this Actually happened animation and love storytime/ story time, true stories animated videos, watch our best video:Don't Judge A Book By It's Cover:https://bit.ly/2y4QPsz

    Preview: Hearing aids

    Preview: Hearing aids

    Story By Brad Subscribe: There was this guy called Brad, and one day he found something he could never have dreamed of - he was infected HIV-positive.He found out when he was 16 years old. Brad played for the volleyball team at his school. Every year, he had a medical before starting his training.That time, Brad was called into to see the school doctor for a private talk. It turned out to be a moment he would never forget. A lot of things were explained to him, but he only remembered that one phrase: “You’re HIV-positive.” The feeling was one of plummeting down from a very high building. “What is aids? This has to be a mistake,” he thought. But it wasn’t. He had no idea how he had caught it. Neither he nor any member of his family was part of one of the risk groups. He went over the issue in his mind for hours on end, but gave up after getting nowhere.Brad has little recollection of what he did over the next few weeks. He was angry at his doctor for smiling at him when she talked about his therapy. Brad should have listened to her more attentively, because she was explaining something important. All he got was that he had to take some pills to extend his miserable life for a few more years.Then there was that horrible talk with his parents. Brad loved them, but they had always been distant. Although they were kind about it when he told them, he sensed the disappointment in their eyes. He knew deep down that they thought HIV was something only bad people got.Brad expected no support from them. He became afraid to leave his house, because he was scared he’d be bullied or infect someone else. He knew, of course, that he couldn’t give someone HIV by just sneezing on them, and that his status was entirely confidential, but the situation made him irrational.And so Brad shut himself away in his bedroom, only occasionally emerging to go to school. He forgot all about his volleyball training. Sometimes, his parents would come and try and start a conversation, but Brad knew what they were really thinking, and had little interest in talking. He lived a lonely life split between his computer and the TV, imagining that the walls were slowly closing in to crush him.After about a month of this, Coach Stephens turned up to find out why he had quit volleyball. He thought Brad was ill and wanted to help. Brad had vowed to never tell anyone, but the hours of silence led him to blurt out: “I’m HIV-positive, okay? I’m going to die soon, so just leave me alone!” His coach looked at him with a serious expression and said: “No need to shout. You know, I’ve been HIV-positive for 16 years.” His words hit Brad like a bucket of cold water. He’d never realised that there might be other people like him out there. Coach Stephens then explained the idea of antiretroviral therapy, along with other things his doctor had told him about but which he hadn’t been able to take in. Brad cried like a baby.Coach Stephens promised to help him. He talked to his parents, explaining things they would otherwise never have understood. He got Brad back into volleyball training and introduced him to an HIV teenage support group, where he met new and very supportive people. Brad’s life is far from perfect now, but he’s learned to appreciate what life has given him. His parents are now more supportive, and are learning to be more open. He’s more responsible, both towards himself and others. All this is thanks to Coach Stephens, who gave Brad hope. Now, Brad wants to give someone else hope too. That’s why he’s decided to volunteer to help other teenagers escape the misery he found himself in.Brad has a way to sum up his situation: Instead of feeling HIV-positive, now he just feels positive. He knows he’s not alone, and that he has people around him to give him strength. And there’s one other good thing. Five years ago, he met a young woman who became his soulmate. Two years ago, she agreed to become his wife. Last week, she gave birth to his first, entirely healthy daughter. Brad has no way to express how happy he is. If only he could have known what lay ahead of him six years ago!How did I find out that I have HIV + 0:05I talked to my new doctor 0:55 Talk with my parents 1:15I locked myself alone 1:50Coach Stevens came to me 2:17I was crying like a baby 3:14I decided to volunteer 3:50A private one thing 4:15What's your story? Actually Happened want to hear it!Send your story time: [email protected] you liked this Actually happened animation and love storytime/ story time, true stories animated videos, watch our best video:Don't Judge A Book By It's Cover:https://bit.ly/2y4QPsz

Professional and skilled writers are here to provide you with a quality assistance with Research Paper On Hiv Aids Among Teenagers Who Attempt

HIV/AIDS Testing: A Wake Up Call - Thirty years ago, the AIDS, “Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome”, was not a well-known disease and infected people by that disease were not quarantined, because of lack of information about the disease. High HIV seroprevalence in the USA has been found among imprisoned young females with a history of injecting drug use or prostitution, and among homeless and runaway youths (Lindegren et al., 1994). Treatment-seeking behaviour – the increase in gonorrhoea rates observed in adolescents in the USA is thought to “Adolescent HIV/AIDS is an epidemic with difference and its control needs to be adolescent specific.” Acknowledgments This review article on Adolescent HIV/AIDS is written as a part of activity under AIDS International Training Research Program (AITRP). KEY POINTS. More than one million people are living with HIV in the United States of America (USA); one in seven are unaware of their status. The HIV epidemic is driven by sexual contact and is heavily concentrated among certain key populations, in particular gay men and other men who have sex with men. Introduction: Human immunodeficiency virus infection / acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is a disease of the human immune system caused by infection with human immunodeficiency virus. The first cases were reported in 1981. Suicide in Adolescents INTRODUCTION Suicide is intentional self-inflicted acts that end in death. Each year, an average of 30,000 suicide deaths occur in the United States and it is estimated that 6,000 of those suicides are committed by teenagers (CDC, 2002). The cardinal objective of this study was to assess the level of quality of life among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in Jammu and Kashmir State of India. The Journal of HIV/AIDS Prevention & Education for Adolescents & Children is committed to providing you with a humanistic, non-judgmental, and non-moralistic view of the effects of HIV/AIDS on . HIV and AIDS information and facts. Read latest medical articles and view educational videos on AIDS and HIV symptoms and treatments. Stay informed about new developments on the AIDS/HIV front. The collection of free sample research projects and research project examples on any topics, disciplines. Free research projects, research papers and research proposals for high school, college, University, Master's and PhD students.